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Course Syllabi

FACULTY FOUNDATION COURSES

CF 101 COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA Syllabus

Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 1
Semester: Fall
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
Instructor: Assoc. Prof. Banu Baybars-Hawks, Asst. Prof. Lemi Baruh, Assoc. Prof. Asuman Suner, Murat Akser

Objective + Contents
The mass media are institutions and technologies whose business is the communication of symbols, stories, and information. In this class we will examine such culture industries as the internet, radio, television, movies, newspapers, advertising, and public relations, as well as larger issues such as globalization. The media touch our lives in intimate ways, in our tastes, pleasures, and dreams; they also wield significant political, economic, and social power. Because they are so pervasive, media are often invisible. This class aims to be a citizen's guide to the mass media and thereby to explore some key questions today. Since the media constantly impose themselves on people it is advantageous to know more about them: their functions, responsibilities, purpose and economic structure. The course will provide a basic knowledge of the communication system, the uses of media, and means of objectively evaluating media performance in light of media problems, promises and potential.

Prerequisities: None

Recommended Reading:
John Vivian, The Media of Mass Communication, 2006 Update, 7th edition (USA: Allyn & Bacon, 2006)
Şermin Tekinalp and Ruhdan Uzun, İletişim Araştırmaları ve Kuramları, (İstanbul: Derin Yayınları, 2004)

Teaching methods:
The class will be primarily lecture and discussion. Students should prepare for each class by doing the readings assigned. We will also do some in-class media analysis work and group projects.

Assesment Tools:Grading:
Mid-term exam, final exam, research paper and in-class assignments/attendance/class participation.

Instruction Language: English.

CF 102 COMMUNICATION AND ART


Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 1

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Erden Kosova, Hülya Nuran

Objective + Contents: This is a course aiming to introduce fine arts to students; to give them the
idea of what art is and why we call it art. The main concern is to look at art from a cultural
communication perspective. Organization and institutionalization of art in the cultural field would \ be
investigated throughout the course.

Recommended Reading:
M. A. Staniszewski (1995) Believing is Seeing: Creating the Culture of Art, Penguin.

Teaching Methods: Classroom discussions, tutorials

Assessment Tools: Homeworks, midterm, final

Instruction Language: English

CF 103 KEYWORDS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 1

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Assoc. Prof. Levent Soysal, Süncem Koçer

Objective and Contents:
This course aims to teach the students of the Faculty of Communication the major concepts in humanities and social sciences, to develop their capacities for critical thinking and analysis, and to have them learn ways of doing research. In the first semester, the course focuses on the content and social context of concepts such as civilization, history, time, individual, society, family, state, nation, information (age), media, globalization, which the students will encounter in their four years of university education. The goal will be to identify the historically and spatially specific transformations that these concepts has gone through and the ways that they are institutionally framed, as well as covering the social scientific theories that utilize and build upon these concepts. In the second term, the focus of the course turns to concepts that the students encounter in their everyday experiences. Moving from general topics such as popular music, literature, novel, poetry, travel, discovery, poverty, wealth, city, environment, supermarket, brand, and fashion, the course surveys theoretical approaches to taste, senses, aesthetic, genre, consumption, urbanity, and identity, and encourages the students to critically and conceptually engage their own vocabularies. In both terms students will be asked to carry out research, ranging from library to internet search, using archives to preparing surveys, drawing up inventories to participant observation.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:

Course Reader
R. Williams (1985). Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society, Oxford University Press.
W. L. Neuman (2002).Social Research Methods: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches, 5th ed. Pearson Allyn & Bacon

Teaching Methods: Lecture, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Homeworks, final papers

Instruction Language: English

CF 104 HISTORY OF ART AND CIVILIZATIONS

Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 1
Semester: Spring
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
Instructor: Assoc.Prof. Çetin Sarıkartal, Hülya Nuran

Objective + Contents: In this course students are introduced to fundamental concepts of art and its development interacting with different civilizations around the world.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Philip J. Adler. World Civilizations: Volume II: Since 1500, Wadsworth Publishing, 2007.

Teaching Methods: Projects/ teamwork

Assessment Tools: Final paper, project

Instruction Language: English

CF 105 COMPUTING SKILLS

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 1

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Hülya Nuran, Etkin Çiftçi, Zeren Göktan

Objective and Contents:
This course aims to introduce utilization of basic computer usage and computer graphics. Use of elementary
software applications (word processing, spreadsheets, database management, and graphics); working
Graphic User Interface environments (i.e., Windows, Macintosh); matching tasks to hardware and software
(bitmapped and object oriented graphics, desktop publishing, presentation graphics, computer-aided design,
advanced business application, communication, multimedia, and budgeting); identifying software packages
based on specific applications.

Recommended Reading:
Long (2005), Computer: Brief Edition, Prentice Hall.

Prerequisites: None

Teaching Methods: Projects/Teamwork

Assessment Tools: Term project

Instruction Language: English

CF 107 VISUAL APPRECIATION


Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 1

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Övgü Gökçe, Balca Ergener

Objective and Contents:
This course offers a basic introduction to visual culture through first-hand experience. The course will consist
of in-class meetings and field trips. While familiarizing ourselves to the artistic and cultural map of Istanbul,
we will be discussing how to approach different visual material from different periods, places, and mediums.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course Reader
G. Rose (2006). Visual Methodologies: An Introduction to the Interpretation of Visual Methods, Sage.
M. Sturken (2009). Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture. Oxford University Press.

Teaching Methods: Lecture, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Homeworks, final papers

Instruction Language: English

CF 108 COMMUNICATIONSCAPES

Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 1
Semester: Spring
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
Instructor: Eylem Kaftan, Pınar Seden Meral

Objective + Contents:
This course aims to introduce the students to the operating principles of different types of media. Students are expected to involved in media projects ranging from ad campaigns to video art

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Roger Silverstone. Why Study the Media?, Sage, 1999.

Teaching Methods: Projects/ teamwork

Assessment Tools: Final paper, project

Instruction Language: English

CF 124 UNDERSTANDING IMAGE

Type of Course: Lecture
Year: 1
Semester: Spring
Credits: 3 (3+0+0)
Instructor: Gözde Onaran, Övgü Gökçe

Objective + Contents:
This course is designed to give students a basic conceptual frame and vocabulary for understanding, creating, and conversing about image, as well as providing them with tools of visualizing their ideas. Employing a variety of different image generating techniques, students will produce visual representations based upon specific assigned subjects. Imaging methods will include electronic digital and conventional media, such as photography, illustration, type (as image) and collage.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course reader
J. Berger (1995). Ways of Seeing, Penguin Books.
R. Barthes (1982). Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, Hill and Wang, USA.

Teaching Methods: Projects/ teamwork

Assessment Tools: Final paper, project

Instruction Language: English

CF 204 COMMUNICATION LAW AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 1

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Assoc. Prof. Dr. Tekin Memiş

Objective + Contents : This course will demonstrate the main principles of intellectual property law. Thereby, definitions and types of intellectual property, international agreements on intellectual property, ownership of intellectual property, legal characteristics of legal protection of intellectual property, infringement of the rights of intellectual property and protection mechanisms, trademark law, acquisition of trademarks, principles of registering trademarks, conditions on usage of trademarks, breach of trademark rights and protection mechanisms, causes for termination of trademarks, patent law and its main principles, concepts of patent and invention and conditions on registration, right to patent and its limits and consequences including an analysis of industrial designs will be examined

Recommended Reading:
Tekinalp, Fikri Mülkiyet Hukuku,Arıkan Yayınevi, İstanbul 2005.
Arkan Marka Hukuku, Cilt I-II, Ankara 1998.

Teaching Methods: Lecture

Assessment Tools: Midter, final exam

Instruction Language: Turkish

RADIO, CINEMA AND TELEVISION DEPARTMENT COURSES

CF 206 POPULAR CULTURE


Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Asst. Prof. Levent Soysal

Objective + Contents:
In this course students will examine how popular culture is becoming increasingly central to social life in Turkey and around the world. This course will study popular culture as an expanding network of leisure activities, commercial entertainment, media technologies, and subcultural practices. This course will focus on the following forms of media and entertainment as popular culture: Television, Film, Popular Music and Youth Culture, Advertisements, and Sports. The primary objective of the course is to provide students with the tools to critically analyze these various forms of popular culture and understand them within a broader social context. Students will learn to incorporate the analysis of popular culture into their existing research projects or interests.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading: Course Reader

Teaching Methods: Lecture, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Homeworks, final papers

Instruction Language: English


CF 215 DISTANCE LEARNING: WORLD CULTURES

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Dr. Melis Behlil

Objective + Contents:
At the turn of the 21st century, it is impossible to think and work without “globalization.” Ideas like the "global village" or the "shrinking planet" color our vision of the world and influence the way we do things. If the defining perspective of the Cold War world was "division," the defining perspective of globalization is “integration.” The symbol of the Cold War system was a wall, which divided everyone. The symbol of the globalization system is a World Wide Web, which unites everyone

There are as many different discourses on globalization as there are disciplines and interests. Globalization is about financial capital, commodities, manufacturing, art, media (music, television, movies, the Internet, etc.), language, literature, human rights, social and environmental justice, sustainability, global warming and the list is long. To discuss various issues related to globalization, the students engage in a global conversation with fellow students from other corners of the world. The course is designed and conducted together with College of Staten Island (USA) and utilizes video-conferencing over internet to realize exchange of ideas, presentations, and lectures. In doing weekly assignments, students collaborate with their partners abroad. There will be extensive discussion sessions at the end of each virtual lecture. The aim is to make students question each topic from the perspective of both global marketing and human needs.

Recommended Reading:
Course reader
F. J. Lechner, J. Boli (2004). The Globalization Reader, 2nd ed., Blackwell Publishing.

Teaching Methods: Classroom discussion, chat, and assignments

Assessment Tools: Midterm & final exams.

Instruction Language: English

CF 310 CULTURAL INDUSTRIES

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Assoc.Prof. Levent Soysal

Objective + Contents:

The course will enable students to critically analyze and assess theories, examples, cases and trends from
the cultural and creative industries. The course will have a multidisciplinary approach and will, through case
studies focusing on selected sectors, explore and investigate the link between creativity, culture, innovation,
markets and business.

Recommended Reading:
Course reader
D. Hesmondhalgh (2007). The Cultural Industries. Sage.

Teaching Methods: Classroom discussion, chat, and assignments

Assessment Tools: Midterm & final exams.

Instruction Language: English

CF 340 CITY, CULTURE, MEDIA

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Eylem Kaftan

Objective + Contents:

As the world globalizes, cities gain prominence as loci of cultural production and media. Especially in the recent decades, cities have become centers of attraction for world culture, spectacle, and performance, independent of the nation-states in which they are located. The course will comparatively explore the changing urban dynamics and cultural landscape of major mega cities such as New York, Berlin, London and Istanbul.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:

Course reader

Teaching Methods: Lecture, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Homeworks, final papers

Instruction Language: English

CF 401 EVERYDAY LIFE, CULTURE, SOCIETY

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 4

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Dr. Aslı Kotoman

Objective + Contents:

In this course the goal is to have the students discuss the contemporary issues of the local, national, and global order and develop a conceptual knowledge about everyday life, culture, and society in which they live. Concepts, theories, and works are re-examined and re-worked through the optic of new theoretical developments, and new intellectual and social movements. Special attention will be paid to the issues and debates that concern RTC in order to prepare students to their post-graduate professional life.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:

Course reader

Teaching Methods: Classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Midterm, final paper

Instruction Language: English

CF 404 ART, IDEAS AND FUTURE

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 4

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Dr. Melis Behlil

Objective + Contents:

Moving from paradigms and problems on the agenda of Turkey and the world, the course provides a forum for students to deliberate upon propositions developed for the 'future' by the art world and intellectuals, or propositions they conceive for themselves. In small or large groups, students will meet with experts, artists, and people from every walk of life with whom they will interact and encounter in their everyday professional lives. They will discuss their projects for the future.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:

Course reader

Teaching Methods: Classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Midterm and final exams

Instruction Language: English

CF 415 FESTIVAL MANAGEMENT

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 4

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Hülya Uçansu

Objective + Contents:

This course is designed to introduce the organizational aspect of an international film festival. The course will cover all stages of organizing a film festival within a practical framework with emphasis on the technical and organizational aspects. The aim of the course is to contribute to students’ organizational skills and professional aspirations. During the course, students will meet prominent curators, practitioners, and actors of the festival scene and learn from their knowledge and experience.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:

K. Turan (2002). Sundance to Sarajevo, University of California Press.

Teaching Methods: Lecture, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Homeworks, final project

Instruction Language: English


RC 121 INTRODUCTION TO RTC I
Syllabus ( )

Type of Course: Lecture + Workshop

Year: 1

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (1+4+0)

Instructor: Tevfik Başer, Özer Bereket , and staff

Objective + Contents:
The goal of the course is to provide the students with a basic understanding of cinema and television. The course is divided into two modules: cinema and television. The students will learn the history and the development of contemporary film and television, as well as the future trends in both media. These introductory modules will be supported by technical camera and editing workshops in order to train students to use digital cameras and digital editing software (Avid and FinalCutPro). In the second semester special workshops will be conducted to introduce students to the world of radio programming. The students will be introduced to pre-production, production and postproduction phases of films and TV programs. Working in groups, students will learn directing, shooting and editing skills as they write and direct their own videos. Expert instructors in their fields will teach the course collaboratively.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
J. Monaco (2000). How to Read a Film,3rd ed., Oxford Press, London.
N. Montfort, N. Wardrip-Fruin (2003). The New Media Reader, MIT Press.
Teaching Methods: Classroom discussion , projects/ teamwork

Assessment Tools: Term project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 122 INTRODUCTION TO RTC II

Type of Course: Lecture + Workshop

Year: 1

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (1+4+0)

Instructor: Tevfik Başer, Özer Bereket, and staff

Objective + Contents: See RC 121

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
J. Monaco (2000). How to Read a Film,3rd ed., Oxford Press, London.
N. Montfort, N. Wardrip-Fruin (2003). The New Media Reader, MIT Press.

Teaching Methods: Classroom discussion, projects/teamwork

Assessment Tools: Term project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 201 FILM HISTORY AND THEORIES I Syllabus (


Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Melis Behlil

Objective + Contents:
This is a survey course aiming to familiarize students with the major movements, figures, films, as well as theories from the history of cinema, from its earliest days up until WWII.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
D. Bordwell and K. Thompson. Film History: An Introduction, Second Edition. Boston : McGraw-Hill, 2003.
R. Stam. Film Theory: An Introduction. Malden / Oxford : Blackwell Publishing, 2000.
Teaching Methods: Lecture and classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Papers, midterm exam, final exam

Instruction Language: English

RC 202 FILM HISTORY AND ANALYSIS II

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Melis Behlil

Objective + Contents:
This is a survey course aiming to familiarize students with the major movements, figures, films, as well as theories from the history of cinema, from after the WWII until today.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
D. Bordwell & K. Thompson. Film History: An Introduction, Second Edition. Boston : McGraw-Hill, 2003.
R. Stam. Film Theory: An Introduction. Malden / Oxford : Blackwell Publishing, 2000.
Teaching Methods: Lecture and classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Papers, midterm exam, final exam

Instruction Language: English

RC 209 RTC TECHNOLOGIES

Type of Course: Lecture + Workshop

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Haluk Buran

Objective + Contents:
The course introduces students to the technological aspects of radio, television and cinema as broadcasting media, as well as the technical details of current and developing RTC equipment. In workshops students will learn about analog and digital cameras, mechanical and digital editing equipment, and acoustic and magnetic sound recording devices along with various types of microphones and their accessories. There will be class visits to radio, TV, and film studios and institutes at the end of each section.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading: Course reader

Teaching Methods: Lecture, workshops, site visits

Assessment Tools: Midterm and final exam

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 210 DIGITAL IMAGE AND PRODUCTION

Type of Course: Workshop

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Staff

Objective + Contents:
In a world and media rapidly turning digital, digital technology is now a permanent fixture of filmmaking. While analog and mechanical technologies are losing their luster, digital is becoming ubiquitous in everyday life. This course covers topics and techniques ranging from two-dimensional to three-dimensional digital image, still image to 3D animation, as well as image manipulation and use of sound effects in digital environments. The students will be trained to use computer programs essential for the creation and production of digital images.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
P. A. Mayer, (1999). Computer Media and Communication: A Reader, Oxford University Press, Oxford .
J. Pilling, (1999).A Reader in Animation Studies, John Libbey & Company Ltd.
Teaching Methods: Computer usage, teamwork, projects

Assessment Tools: Term project

Instruction Language: English

RC 211 SOPHOMORE TUTORIAL Syllabus (


Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Murat Akser

Objective + Contents:
In this course, students will examine basic scholarly and canonical texts and manifestos related to RTC. The primary goal of sophomore tutorial is to strengthen the conceptual knowledge base of the students, to teach methods of seeing and critique, and to introduce theories of art, communication, and film. Theoretical discussions will be supplemented by examples from cinema, television, or radio.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
L. Braudy and Marshall Cohen eds. (2004) Film Theory and Criticism, Oxford University Press.

Teaching Methods: Classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Participation, papers

Instruction Language: English

RC 221 WRITING /SCREENPLAYS

Type of Course: Lecture + Workshop

Year: 1

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Tevfik Başer

Objective + Contents:
The course introduces topics such as the rules of writing a screenplay, the rules to observe in the narration of stories, the place of the scriptwriter in filmmaking, the differences between original screenplays and adaptations, and the difference between stage and screen plays. The students write short stories and screenplays for films.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
D. Howard (1995). The Tools of Screenwriting: A Writer's Guide to the Craft and Elements of a Screenplay, St. Martin�s Griffin .
S. Field (2004). Screenplay, Delta Press.
L. Egri (1972). The Art of Dramatic Writing, Touchstone.

Teaching Methods: Projects, teamwork

Assessment Tools: Term project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 222 LIGHT AND SOUND

Type of Course: Lecture + Workshop

Year: 1

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Murat Erün

Objective + Contents:
This course is designed to teach the students the fundamentals of lighting and sound techniques. The students learn technical skills to deal with different possible scenarios in a film setting. Examples from different genres will be screened and discussed in order to illustrate how light and sound effect the overall atmosphere of a film. Students will shoot scenes and short films while they work with various light and sound equipments. Special attention will be devoted to sound engineering -physical properties of sound, sound control, and sound recording on location.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course Reader
K. Malkiewicz (1986). Film Lighting, Fireside Publishing , USA .
H. Zettl (2004). Sight Sound Motion, Wadsworth Publishing Company.
Teaching Methods: Projects/ teamwork

Assessment Tools: Term project

Instruction Language: English

RC 223 EDITING

Type of Course: Lecture + Workshop

Year: 1

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Çiçek Kahraman

Objective + Contents:
The course aims at providing the students with conceptual knowledge and the techniques of visual narration. Through lectures students will learn how to create meaning by assembling scenes and sequences. Special emphasis will be given to concepts such as cinematic space and time, cinematic reality, rhythm, and continuity. Through practical experience with digital editing software students will learn to manage the order and time of each shot and the decision process to produce positive visual continuity.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading: Course Reader
W. Murch. In the Blink of an Eye Revised 2nd Edition, Silman-James Press, 2001.

Teaching Methods: Projects/ teamwork

Assessment Tools: Projects, midterm exam.

Instruction Language: English

RC 224 CINEMATOGRAPHY

Type of Course: Lecture + Workshop

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Hayk Kirakosyan

Objective + Contents:
The course explains the basic principles of cinematography - storytelling with visual imagination. By using historical (history of motion picture art) digression, comparing with painting and poetry, the course analyzes best examples of the European, Russian and American cinematographer’s work. At the same time the course gives basic information about practical cinematography – motion picture camera, lenses, film stock, lighting and, post-production.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
B. Brown (2004). Cinematography Theory and Practice. Focal Press.

Teaching Methods: Projects / teamwork

Assessment Tools: Term project

Instruction Language: English

RC 228 DIRECTING

Type of Course: Workshop

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Tevfik Başer

Objective + Contents:
In this course the students are taught the general principles of directing and practice these principles by making their own movies. The course involves screenplay development meetings, location searching, staging and directing actors, mise-en-scene, discussions on camera settings and storyboards for certain scenes, technical and aesthetic limitations, and advice on editing and completion. Each student will go through the pre-production, production and post-production phases as a director and will learn fundamental skills and know-how. In addition, the students will be exposed to the world of directing and directors in special workshops with renowned Turkish film directors and learn the roads to directing, as well as creating one's own directorial language.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course reader
S. Katz (1991). Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visualizing from Concept to Screen, Michael Wiese Productions.
D. Mamet (2002). On Directing, New Riders Press.

Teaching Methods: Projects, teamwork

Assessment Tools: Term project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 239 AUTEUR CINEMA

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+3)

Instructor: Prof. Dr. Deniz Bayrakdar

Objective + Contents:

This course will examine film directors with unique styles across the world. Following an auteurist investigation of Alfred Hitchcock’s films the course will examine auteurs from Spain’s industry from the Franco period to the present, Denmark’s Dogme95 movement and its antecedents, the US independent sector across several decades. autuers India, Hong Kong, Japan, France, and Italy will also be studies. The course investigates the relations between auteurs, national industries, production histories, and the resultant films’ intersection with political and social currents of their place and time.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course reader

Teaching Methods: Film screening, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Class participation, homework.

Instruction Language: English

RC 240 EUROPEAN CINEMAS

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 1 (0+2+0)

Instructor: Prof. Deniz Bayrakdar

Objective + Contents:
The aim of the course is to enhance film movements that were created and experienced in Europe and consequently influenced other countries’ filmmaking styles. This semester the course will examine contemporary developments in the German speaking countries since the demolition of the Berlin Wall, where directors with hyphenated and creolised identities produced “short, sharp” messages like Fatih Akın.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
T. Elsaesser [2005] European Cinema, Face to Face with Hollywood, Amsterdam,
Amsterdam University Press

H. Naficy [2001] An Accented Cinema. Exile and Diasporic Filmmaking.
New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Teaching Methods: Film screening, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Class participation, homework

Instruction Language: English

RC 241 TELEVISION PROGRAMMING

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+3)

Instructor: Özer Bereket

Objective + Contents:
Students will be introduced to a number of technical and non-technical skills, including script writing, directing, and hands-on camera and studio skills such as lighting, sound and editing. This course will also examine the history of television broadcasting today and future trends. Class projects will include both news-oriented material and creative assignments.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course reader

Teaching Methods: lecture, classroom discussion, project

Assessment Tools: Class participation, homework, project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 242 TELEVISION PRODUCTION

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+3)

Instructor: Özer Bereket

Objective + Contents: See RC 241

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course reader

Teaching Methods: lecture, classroom discussion, project

Assessment Tools: Class participation, homework, project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 243 RADIO PROGRAMMING

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+3)

Instructor: Güçlü Mete

Objective + Contents:
This course will focus upon two primary areas, writing for radio and producing for radio. Sometimes a station
manager or program manager will simply hand you something already written, and you will have to produce
it. More often than not, however, especially at smaller stations, you will be expected to both write and
produce the material.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course reader

Teaching Methods: lecture, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Class participation, homework, project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 244 RADIO PRODUCTION

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 2

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+3)

Instructor: Güçlü Mete

Objective + Contents: See RC 243

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course reader

Teaching Methods: lecture, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Class participation, homework, project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 304 RTC MOVEMENTS, LANGUAGES, AND GENRES

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Staff

Objective + Contents:
The course examines what it means to speak of (film) movement, vocabulary, language, and genre within the framework of language and social movement theories and seeks to enable students to perceive the analytical dimensions of the RTC works they study or create. To achieve this goal the students will scrutinize film manifestos that have proposed and effected change and facilitated social movements, ranging from New Realism to Dogma. Films exemplifying these manifestos, as well as genres and particular film vocabularies, will complement the course.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading: Course reader

B. K. Grant (2003). Film Genre Reader III, University of Texas Press.

Teaching Methods: Lecture, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Midterm exam, final paper

Instruction Language: English

RC 305 PHILOSOPHY, AESTHETICS AND CINEMA

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 3

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Prof. Jalal Toufic

Objective + Contents:
Focusing on the works of ancient and contemporary philosophers, from Aristotle and Plato to Kant, Lukacs, and Wittgenstein, the course seeks to examine how philosophy approaches art and aesthetics and to enable students to develop a critical vocabulary and knowledge base in viewing their own RTC works from the perspective of aesthetics.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading: B. Gaut, D. McIver Lopes, (2002). The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics, Routledge.
P. Maynard, S. Feagin , (1998). Aesthetics, Oxford University Press.

Teaching Methods: Lectures, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Midterm, final paper

Instruction Language: English

RC 306 PSYCHOLOGY AND CINEMA

Type of Course: Lecture

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Assoc.Prof. Selim Eyüboğlu

Objective + Contents: .
The course teaches the principal theory, method, and concepts of psychology and social psychology as a way to enable students analytically approach the relationship between psychology and art, audience response, and mass behavior.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading: Course reader

Teaching Methods: Lecture, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Midterm, final paper

Instruction Language: English

RC 308 WORLD CINEMA

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Prof. Louise Spence

Objective + Contents:
This course aims to introduce the students to the different filmmaking cultures around the world. Films from Latin America, Africa and the Middle East will be screened, discussed and analyzed, along with the socio-political contexts within which they were made. The goal is to familiarize the participants with different styles of filmmaking than they are often accustomed to.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course reader

Teaching Methods: Screenings, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Midterm and final paper

Instruction Language: English

RC 311 JUNIOR TUTORIAL

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 3

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Dr. Melis Behlil

Objective + Contents:
The course aims at defining key qualities of what makes a feature length narrative film work. Elements of form such as cinematic space and time, mise-en-scene and editing will be analyzed in the first half the couse. In the second half key styles will be discussed. Key manifestos by visual artists and filmmakers will be discussed to eventually draft a manifesto for Turkish cinema. What makes a film bad is also a good indication to identify how key elements in a film work. Thus students will be asked to hunt for bad as well as good scenes and explain why-how they made their choice.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading: Course reader
D. Bordwell & K. Thompson. Film Art: An Introduction. Boston : McGraw-Hill.

Teaching Methods: Projects, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Projects, midterm exam, final exam.

Instruction Language: English

RC 323 RTC PROJECT RESEARCH SEMINAR

Type of Course: Project

Year: 3

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+3+0)

Instructor: Ahu Sun

Objective + Contents:
In this course students start thinking about their graduation project and will work under the supervision of an adviser based on their RTC concentration-Radio, Television, Cinema. The first semester will be devoted to finding project topics, formulating, developing, and writing project proposals, and making timetables. The second semester will be dedicated to realization of the project. The works produced in this course will be designed as part or trial runs of the graduation project.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading: Course reader

Teaching Methods: Fieldwork, project

Assessment Tools: Project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 324 JUNIOR RTC PROJECT

Type of Course: Project

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+3+0)

Instructor: Staff

Objective + Contents: See RC 323.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading: Course reader

Teaching Methods: Fieldwork, project

Assessment Tools: Project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 325 MAKING DOCUMENTARIES: THEORY

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 3

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Prof. Louise Spence

Objective + Contents:
This course aims to teach the students the major concepts in making documentaries in various RTC mediums. History of documentary filmmaking will be covered including the technological developments and artistic movements that have facilitated "documentary" become a distinguished form. Similarities and differences between documentary and fiction, as well as types of documentaries such as poetic, expository, observational, participatory, reflexive and performative, will be comparatively analyzed. Examples of different types of documentaries will be studied and discussed. In the second part of the course, the students will develop and complete their own documentary projects in their chosen field of RTC.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course reader
B. Nichols (2001). Introduction to Documentary, Indiana University Press.
B. Nichols (1991). Representing Reality: Issues and Concepts in Documentary, Indiana University Press.
A. Rosenthal (1988). New Challenges for Documentary, University of California Press.
A. Rosenthal (2002). Writing, Directing, and Producing Documentary Films and Videos, Southern Illinois University Press.

Teaching Methods: Screenings, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Midterm and final exams, final project

Instruction Language: English

RC 326 MAKING DOCUMENTARIES: PRAXIS

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (2+2+0)

Instructor: Pelin Esmer

Objective + Contents:
This course aims to familiarize the students with the production of a documentary film. This includes project development and research, as well as the actual production process of a documentary. Students are expected to produce small documentary projects.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course reader

Teaching Methods: Projects, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Midterm and final exams, final project

Instruction Language: English

RC 327 PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION AND BUDGETING

Type of Course: Workshop

Year: 3

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Fuat Erman

Objective + Contents:
The goal is to follow and understand the production process of an RTC work beginning with the conception and development of the project to budgeting, and distribution of the finished product. The students will carry out case studies under the guidance of acclaimed RTC producers and distributors.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading: Course Reader

Teaching Methods: Projects, teamwork

Assessment Tools: Term project

Instruction Language: English

RC 328 BUSINESS OF PRODUCING

Type of Course: Lecture + Workshop

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Zeynep Özbatur

Objective + Contents:
This course focuses on film producer’s role as a creative industry worker. This course is aimed to cultivate students’ own creative and producing strategies for the Turkish and international markets through a series of: workshops, business sessions, case studies, production and packaging exercises. Students will have direct interaction with the film, television and new media industries via industry guests, who share exclusive information about: acquisition, development, financing, production, and distribution.


Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor


Recommended Reading:
L. Özalp (2008) Bir Film Yapmak, Hil Yayınları.

Teaching Methods: Projects/ teamwork

Assessment Tools: Term project / Papers

Instruction Language: English

RC 330 SOUND DESIGN

Type of Course: Lecture + Workshop

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Ender Akay

Objective + Contents:
This course is designed to teach the students the fundamentals of sound techniques. The students learn technical skills to deal with different possible scenarios in a film setting. Examples from different genres will be screened and discussed in order to illustrate how sound effects the overall atmosphere of a film. Special attention will be devoted to sound engineering -physical properties of sound, sound control, and sound recording on location.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course Reader

Teaching Methods: Projects/ teamwork

Assessment Tools: Term project / Papers

Instruction Language: English

RC 333 FEATURE SCREENWRITING

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 3

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+3)

Instructor: Tevfik Başer

Objective + Contents:
The aim of this course is to teach each student to write a complete, edited and revised 90 to 120-page original screenplay. In the process of developing their scripts, the course will focus on story structure, dialogue, character development, and cinematic methods. The dramatic problems and possibilities will be discussed and explored throughout the course classic and contemporary films will be analyzed. There will also be a number of writing exercises intended to help student imagine your own premise, structure, characterizations, scene writing and revisions.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:

D. Howard (1993). The Tools of Screenwriting.

Teaching Methods: Film screening, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Class participation, homework, project.

Instruction Language: English

RC 334 WRITING TELEPLAYS

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Haluk Ünal

Objective + Contents:
This course gives students a firm grounding in all the basics of dramatic TV series writing. Students will focus on creating a spec script for an existing show. Students will learn how to select a show, structure and format to industry standards, stay true to a show's characters and spirit, develop a dramatist's sense of dialogue and scene and prepare a television series bible.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading: Course reader

Teaching Methods: Projects, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Final paper, project

Instruction Language: English

RC 335 ADVANCED CINEMATOGRAPHY

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 3

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+3)

Instructor: Hayk Kirakosyan

Objective + Contents:
This course aims at introducing students to motion picture and film negative lighting concepts, principles and
procedures. The students will also be introduced to the relationship between lighting, budget and the
shooting schedule. Students will be asked to work on camera mechanics, functionality and limitations of t he
technologies. This course will place a strong emphasis on the responsibilities of a director of photography.

Prerequisites: RC 204 + consent of the instructor

Recommended Reading:
Course reader

Teaching Methods: Film screening, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Class participation, homework, project

Instruction Language: English

RC 337 VISUAL EFFECTS DESIGN

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 3

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+3)

Instructor: Staff

Objective + Contents:
The course aims to provide advanced digital imagining understanding for students, and the students may
treat the knowledge as a bridge connecting to generic digital applications in CGI for their film projects and as a first step on the road to becoming a CGI artist. The course concentrates to deliver the knowledge to support the digital imaging production work flow. Students are asked to produce high quality digital visual contents using Adobe After Effects.

Prerequisites: RC 210 + consent of the instructor

Recommended Reading:
Course reader

Teaching Methods: Film screening, classroom discussion

Assessment Tools: Class participation, homework, project

Instruction Language: English

RC 341 TELEVISION REPORTING

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 2

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+3)

Instructor: Mithat Bereket

Objective + Contents:
This course is aimed to give students a basic understanding of the skills required to produce a news report from start to finish. Students will learn the mechanics of developing, producing, writing, shooting, editing and presenting a story for air on a television newscast. Also students’ writing and storytelling skills will be strengthened, as these are the central skills needed for reporting. The basic skills are learning to be flexible and fast as students adapt to the pressures of working under deadline pressure. At the end of this course, students will write and produce a variety of television news stories in an ethical, engaging and informative manner.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course reader

Teaching Methods: lecture, classroom discussion, project

Assessment Tools: Class participation, homework, project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 342 TV FORMATS AND GENRES

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+3)

Instructor: Aslı Kotaman

Objective + Contents:
This course aims to introduce the students to the different categories of television genres. Students will
learn the creation, budgeting and business aspects of such tv formats as industrials, corporate videos, and
PSAs. At the end of the course students will be asked to produce a sample work from each of the formats.

Prerequisites: None

Recommended Reading:
Course reader

Teaching Methods: lecture, classroom discussion, project

Assessment Tools: Class participation, homework, project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 343 DIRECTING TELEVISION

Type of Course: Seminar

Year: 3

Semester: Fall

Credits: 3 (3+0+3)

Instructor: Staff

Objective + Contents:
This course aims to teach the students intermediate level production skills and demonstrate television studio production techniques. Students will become part of the production team and learn how to focus on a specific task of the studio crew. Students will take different production roles and produce television projects.

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor

Recommended Reading:
H. Zettl (2003) Television Production Handbook, Wadsworth.

Teaching Methods: lecture, classroom discussion, project

Assessment Tools: Class participation, homework, project

Instruction Language: Turkish

RC 344 ADVANCED EDITING

Type of Course: Lecture + Workshop

Year: 3

Semester: Spring

Credits: 3 (3+0+0)

Instructor: Çiçek Kahraman

Objective + Contents:
In this course students will obtain advanced technical and analytical skills necessary to edit a narrative film. The advanced organizational skills necessary to easily edit a film and advanced knowledge of post-production protocols in digital editing will be covered. At the end of the course students will be able to understand and use elements of narrative editing strategies including rhythm, pacing, point-of-view, screen direction, matching cuts and script analysis and communication with collaborators.


Prerequisites: RC 223 + consent of the instructor

Recommended Reading:

R.D.Pepperman (2004) The Eye is Quicker: Film Editing Making A Good Film Better, Michael Wiese Productions.

Teaching Methods: Projects/ teamwork

Assessment To